Kelly and her daughter voting

“You can vote at 5 today, Mom,” said my 11-year old over her morning cereal earlier this week. I put down my coffee and gave her a smile that was filled with a mix of astonishment and pride.

It was Election Day in our town. We selected three members of the town council. Being a local election (and an uncontested one at that), there hadn’t been much fanfare about this particular Election Day, but my daughter was aware of it. And, more importantly, she prioritized voting in our busy schedule. It wasn’t a question of if I should vote, but when I would.

Listening to her filled me with excitement for the future. It filled me with anticipation for the next generation of engaged citizens. And, it filled me with anticipation about the League’s second century and what we can accomplish.

Just as our foremothers looked to us to continue the fight, we can look to those coming behind us to stand with us, learn from us and someday lead us. While specific issues change, that fundamental desire for a stronger community – a place better for your family and for your neighbors – never changes. This has been the cornerstone of League of Women Voters since 1920.

With Mother’s Day fast-approaching and with my ballot securely cast, I feel grateful for the lessons that I have received from the my mom and the many “League moms” that I have known, and am proud to share those civic lessons with my daughters.

Making Democracy Work® requires determination, and the activists who fought to secure the right to vote for women and founded the League of Women Voters had it in spades. For 95 years, the League has worked to empower voters to tackle issues important to them and to improve our local, state and federal government. I am raising my daughters to continue the fight to keep the power of our democracy in the hands of the people. I know that my girls will never miss an Election Day. Now, if I could just get them to remember to brush their teeth!