• While politicians debate the sources of climate change, for women in the developing world, it doesn’t much matter whether the droughts and food price spikes they endure are manmade or not, the result is the same, poverty and hunger.  Today is International Women Day and a good day to remember that we are all sisters on the planet.

  • The League joined members of the environmental community urging the Senate to oppose S.J. Res.37, the Congressional Review Act disapproval resolution sponsored by Senator Inhofe that
    would eliminate the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) life-saving Mercury and AirToxics Standards for power plants.

  • Multi media

    Climate Change Panel

    Watch the video of Climate Change Panel.

    About the Climate Change Panel

    Moderator: Sarah Diefendorf,
    LWVUS 2nd Vice-President

  • October 28-39,1975. Bill Ryan, Voter editor, Margaret Sutherland, President, LWV- Nebraska; Gwen Murphee, ETF Chairman, Ruth Hinerfled, IR Chairman.
  • Eleanor Revelle, LWVUS CCTF, June 23, 2009

    The climate of the Midwestern states is already changing. Annual average temperatures have risen in recent decades, with the largest increases in the winter months. Extreme heat events are occurring more frequently, and heavy downpours are becoming much more common as well. The duration of lake ice, including on the Great Lakes, is decreasing, and the growing season is starting earlier and lasting longer.

  • By Eleanor Revelle (LWVIL and LWVUS Climate Change Task Force Member)

    Facing the growing evidence that burning fossil fuels is contributing significantly to global climate change, policymakers are evaluating strategies for reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. They have two general approaches to consider. 

  • The impacts of global warming on human and natural systems are now being observed nearly everywhere. In 2007, the Nobel Prize-winning U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicted serious risks and damages to livelihoods, human infrastructure, societies, species, and ecosystems unless future warming is reduced. So far this decade, emissions, warming, and impacts, such as ice melt and sea level rise, have all been at the upper end of IPCC projections.

  • By Eleanor Revelle (LWVIL and LWVUS Climate Change Task Force Member)

    With the demise of cap-and-trade legislation during the 2010 session of Congress, the climate action spotlight has shifted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Clean Air Act (CAA). But efforts are now underway to block EPA regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

  • Eleanor Revelle, LWVUS CCTF, June 23, 2009

    The climate of the Midwestern states is already changing. Annual average temperatures have risen in recent decades, with the largest increases in the winter months. Extreme heat events are occurring more frequently, and heavy downpours are becoming much more common as well. The duration of lake ice, including on the Great Lakes, is decreasing, and the growing season is starting earlier and lasting longer.

  • The evidence is clear that human-induced climate change is underway.

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