• Leading Environmental Groups Call on Senate to Reject It, Commend Veto Threat from White House

    Washington, DC – September 23, 2011: Today the House of Representatives passed a sweeping anti-environment bill that blocks two landmark public health safeguards against air pollution. The TRAIN Act, H.R. 2401, blocks standards that would curb mercury emissions from power plants and reduce pollution that travels across state lines and endangers communities. Leading environmental and public health groups (listed below) issued the following statement after the House vote:

    “We are heartened by the President’s strong stand against the TRAIN Act and against pollution with his promise to veto this dangerous legislation.  His leadership will keep Americans from being forced to breathe smog and other dangerous air pollutants.  We call on the U.S. Senate to stand strong and reject the TRAIN Act and its deadly impacts on public health.  Hundreds of thousands of asthma attacks and heart attacks and tens of thousands of premature deaths can be prevented with common sense clean air safeguards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    “The House today showed they have bought the false argument that we need to choose between protecting lives and creating jobs. Now we need the Senate and the President to protect our right to breathe.”

    Environment America

    Natural Resources Defense Council

    Sierra Club

    League of Conservation Voters

    US Climate Action Network

    League of Women Voters

    Environmental Defense Fund

    Earthjustice

  • Pledges to Keep Working Toward a Fair, Independent, and Diverse Judiciary
     
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | September 16, 2011

    COLUMBIA, SC – The League of Women Voters of South Carolina celebrates Constitution Day with the announcement that the successful statewide education campaign, “Quest for a More Diverse Judiciary,” begun in September 2010, will continue for an additional year.

    “Of the three branches of our government, the judiciary depends most on the public trust,” said Barbara Zia and Peggy Brown, Co-Presidents of the League of Women Voters of South Carolina. “Throughout 2012, the League of Women Voters of South Carolina and our eleven local Leagues will continue to educate policymakers about the value of independence, transparency, and diversity for our judges and our courts.”

    On October 21, the state League will join the South Carolina Women Lawyers Association in Columbia to co-sponsor the conference "Women Lawyers and Leadership: Status and Success in a Changed Profession.”

    Upcoming local campaign events include an October 12 forum on Hilton Head Island, “A Case for Diversity in South Carolina Courts,” featuring state Senator Tom Davis and others, and a November 15 forum in Greenville, “The Interrelationship between Judicial Independence and Judicial Accountability,” co-sponsored by the Riley Institute at Furman University and featuring the Honorable Rebecca Love Kourlis, Executive Director of the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System.

    For more information, visit www.lwvsc.org/judicialinitiative.

  • League of Women Voters Urges U.S. Justice Department to Object

    Washington, DC—The League of Women Voters of the United States has joined the League of Women Voters of Texas in urging Attorney General Eric Holder to reject the congressional redistricting plan submitted by the state of Texas on the grounds that it would disenfranchise minority voters and is in clear violation of the landmark Voting Rights Act.

    “The Texas plan is by far the most extreme example of racial gerrymandering among all the redistricting proposals passed by lawmakers so far this year. This plan is blatantly designed to stifle the voices of minority voters in favor of locking in partisan gains,” said national League president Elisabeth MacNamara.  “The Department of Justice needs to unequivocally object to this plan and tell the state to start over.”

    “Growth in minority communities over the last decade, according to the Census, accounts for ninety percent of the population shifts that afforded our state with an unparalleled four new congressional seats this year,” explained Texas League president Karen Nicholson.  “Instead of recognizing this, the plan passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Perry actually affords minorities with less electoral opportunity than they currently have.  This hostile back-stepping is not only manipulative; it’s also prohibited under the Voting Rights Act.” 

    “Numbers don’t lie,” concluded Nicholson.  “Hard-working minority voters have changed the face of Texas over the past decade.  Our democracy needs to reflect that.” 

    A significant number of individuals, and civil rights, civic, and community organizations including the League of Women Voters of Texas testified repeatedly that the congressional map was clearly designed to benefit lawmakers’ partisan interests while egregiously shortchanging minority voters and fracturing close-knit communities of interest.  

    The Texas League testified at hearings of both the House Redistricting Committee and the Senate Select Redistricting Committee and is available for further comment upon request. Read the comment letter  or learn more at www.lwvtexas.org.  

     

    Contact:  

    LWVUS- Kelly Ceballos
    (202) 263-1331; kceballos@lwv.org

    LWV of Texas- Anita Privett
    (512) 467-2674; advocacy@lwvtexas.org

    ###

    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages the informed and active
    participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

  • Washington, DC – The below is a statement by national League President Elisabeth MacNamara:

    “This week the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks looms very large in the media and on our minds. It has now become routine to say that everything changed that day. Every generation can remember such a day. For my generation, it was the day President Kennedy was shot, for my father, Pearl Harbor. My children will always remember where they were on 9/11. How these catastrophic events change us depends on how we react. After Pearl Harbor, we fought a war, with an end, against forces of evil. But, those that lived through that war balanced the ongoing Cold War with real progress towards greater social and economic equality and a sense of the common good that resulted in environmental protections.  After President Kennedy was assassinated, his successor was able to pass the Voting Rights Act and wage a war on poverty.

    “After ten years of fighting the war on terror, we still have the chance to turn the tragedy of 9/11 into something positive for this country, but only if organizations like the League of Women Voters and those who support us have the strength and the courage to raise our voices in support of an open and accepting society. We cannot give up and cannot give in to those who would prefer to hate and to exclude in a vain effort to make us more secure.

    “The thousands who died ten years ago represented every segment of American society, from wealthy financiers, to immigrants and ordinary working folks. Whatever their status, they were all Americans that day. We honor them by renewing our efforts to invigorate our democracy.”

    ###

    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

  • For Immediate Release

    The League of Women Voters of the United States released the following statement from national president, Elisabeth MacNamara, regarding President Obama’s decision to delay issuing new clean air standard for ozone smog pollution.

    “In the face of political pressure from polluters, President Obama has backed down, a decision which will hurt those most threatened by air pollution, particularly children and seniors. Public opinion is clear - clean air and public health are more important than polluter profits. The science is clear - a new clean air standard for ozone smog is needed to protect peoples’ health.

    “The League of Women Voters is deeply disappointed that President Obama has chosen more air pollution over the health of children and families and that he chose to announce his decision on a day when most Americans are thinking more about the long Labor Day weekend than about the implications of this harmful decision. We expected better from our President.

  • New TV Ad Calls for Elected Officials, Citizens, and Community Leaders to Protect Public Health

    Washington, DC – The League of Women Voters today launched a months-long campaign, including a significant national advertising effort, seeking to renew America’s promise to protect clean air and public health embodied in the highly successful and popular Clean Air Act.

    "Americans from all walks of life will be asked to make the 'Clean Air Promise,’" said Elisabeth MacNamara, president of the national League of Women Voters.

    "We are deeply concerned about attacks on EPA and health protections. Any action to block the EPA from updating Clean Air Act protections, or any delay on behalf of the Administration to avoid implementing new clean air and industrial pollution requirements, is an attack on the health of our children and families, plain and simple," she said.

    The Clean Air Promise Campaign will call on citizens, elected officials and community leaders around the country to join in making this simple promise to protect the health of our children and families:

    "I promise to protect America's children and families from dangerous air pollution.

    "Because toxics and pollutants such as mercury, smog, carbon, and soot, cause thousands of hospital visits, asthma attacks, and even deaths.

    I will support clean air policies and other protections that scientists and public health experts have recommended to the EPA to safeguard our air quality."

    Through the Clean Air Promise campaign, the League of Women Voters hopes to inform and engage Americans on the issue of clean air and to demonstrate what is at stake. Some public officials are trying to undermine the Clean Air Act and to strip the Environmental Protection Agency of its ability to limit air pollution and emission of toxics like mercury, arsenic and other dangerous substances which threaten public health. The League will ask its members to make the promise to protect clean air and will actively work to engage the public and our leaders to make the promise as well. Other clean air advocacy groups are expected to join the campaign in the coming days and weeks.

    "We have to promise each other to protect our air. So the League of Women Voters is asking our communities to stand up and demand that our elected officials promise to keep us safe from the pollution that we cannot control ourselves," said MacNamara.

    "This is a social commitment that we make to each other and which we depend on our elected officials and Congress to carry out and safeguard. Clean air saves lives, and we need to ensure clean air for our children and families in the future. We look forward to working with others to renew the clean air promise," MacNamara said.

    "Air pollution causes thousands of asthma attacks and emergency room visits – but that’s not all. Air pollution is also responsible for debilitating lung disease; heart attacks; damage to infants’ and children’s developing brains, robbing them of IQ; cancer, and deaths," said Dr. Peter Wilk, executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility. "That is too high a price for the American people to pay.

    "We can and we must clean America’s air. We can’t let politics stand in the way. Speaking on behalf of doctors and health professionals across the country, Physicians for Social Responsibility deeply supports the Promise Campaign," Dr. Wilk added.

    "As the mother of an asthmatic child, I have seen firsthand the effects of poor air quality and air pollution," said Alexandra Allred, a mother of an asthmatic child and an advocate for clean air. "My son has been battling this painful and debilitating disease for years, and it’s time that our political and government leaders took the common-sense steps to control the air pollution that hurts him. We need stronger public health protections so other families and children aren’t forced to suffer. I say 'thank you’ to the League of Women Voters for dedicating their organization’s time, talent and resources to fighting dirty air," she said.

    For decades, the League of Women Voters has put the health of families ahead of other concerns. The League was one of the first environmental organizations to speak out for the Clean Air Act and the EPA. Today’s announcement included the release of a new television ad supporting the Clean Air Promise campaign. The ad, featuring a voice over by Alexandra Allred, asks viewers to make their own promise to support clean air and ask others to do the same. The ad features several asthmatic children conducting everyday tasks and being treated for asthma. To watch the ad, click here. To learn more about the Clean Air Promise, visit http://peoplenotpolluters.org/

    "HOME MOVIES" :30

    VISUAL / SOUND

    VOICEOVER

    CITATION

    Home movie footage…

    Kids with nebulizers and inhalers,some with parents, some alone, some outside, some inside.

    ALEX ALLRED: We’re not asking for your pity, or your sympathy.

    We’re not asking for your time,

    or your wallet.

    We’re just asking…

    for your promise.

    Alex Allred, aged 46, is an author, kickboxing instructor, the author of more than 20 non-fiction books, and a passionate advocate on clean air issues. She is a former U.S. bobsledder, winning the gold medal at US Nationals in 1994, and was named the Athlete of the Year by the US Olympic Committee in 1994. She served as the Executive President of Downwinders, an anti-pollution organization in Midlothian, from 2010 to 2011.

    Pictures o f:

     

    Alex, age 11

    Ella, age 8

    Kamira, age 3

    Sophia, age 11

    Chris, age 9

    ALLRED:

    Every year in this country, harmful emissions cause thousands of illnesses, asthma-related hospital visits and even deaths.

    We’re asking every citizen, every elected official, and every parent in America to promise to protect our children from dangerous pollution.

    Now.

    Go to peoplenotpolluters.org

    Don’t just support cleaner air for our kids.

    Promise it.

    Approximately 20,000 people a year die prematurely from air pollution. A 2009 National Academy of Sciences study reported that nearly "20,000 people die prematurely from such causes [air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels]." [The New York Times, October 19, 2009]

    Mercury pollution from refineries, chemical plants, and other industrial facilities causes as many as 2,600 premature deaths a year. In 2011, the EPA proposed an updated standard for mercury emitted by industrial facilities. This updated standard will prevent as many as 2,600 premature deaths, 4,100 heart attacks, and 42,000 asthma attacks a year.

    Mercury pollution from power plants causes as many as 17,000 premature deaths a year. In 2011, the EPA proposed an updated standard for mercury and arsenic from power plants. This update will prevent as many as 17,000 premature deaths and 11,000 heart attacks a year as well as 120,000 asthma attacks.

    Smog and fine particle pollution will cause as many as 34,000 deaths in 2014 alone. Power plant emissions contribute to harmful levels of smog and soot. Delaying EPA’s updated standard will result in many as 34,000 deaths, 15,000 non-fatal heart attacks, and 400,000 asthma attacks in 2014 alone.

    Ozone pollution will cause as many as 12,000 deaths in 2020. Ozone is the primary component of smog. Lowering the amount of ozone in the air to the level recommended by scientists would save as many as 12,000 lives and prevent as many as 58,000 asthma attacks and 5,300 heart attacks in 2020.

    Picture of Noli, age 8

    Text: Make the promise

    Peoplenotpolluters.org

    Brought to you by the League of Women Voters

       

    JULY 25, 2011


    Contact: Kelly Ceballos
    kceballos@lwv.org
    (202) 263-1331

    Peter Wilk, MD
    pwilk@psr.org
    (202) 587-5240

    About the League of Women Voters

    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Learn more: www.lwv.org.###

    "Like" the League on Facebook.

    Follow the League on Twitter @LWV

     

  • New TV Ad Calls for Elected Officials, Citizens, and Community Leaders to Protect Public Health

    Washington, DC – The League of Women Voters today launched a months-long campaign, including a significant national advertising effort, seeking to renew America’s promise to protect clean air and public health embodied in the highly successful and popular Clean Air Act.

    "Americans from all walks of life will be asked to make the 'Clean Air Promise,’" said Elisabeth MacNamara, president of the national League of Women Voters.

    "We are deeply concerned about attacks on EPA and health protections. Any action to block the EPA from updating Clean Air Act protections, or any delay on behalf of the Administration to avoid implementing new clean air and industrial pollution requirements, is an attack on the health of our children and families, plain and simple," she said.

    The Clean Air Promise Campaign will call on citizens, elected officials and community leaders around the country to join in making this simple promise to protect the health of our children and families:

    "I promise to protect America's children and families from dangerous air pollution.

    "Because toxics and pollutants such as mercury, smog, carbon, and soot, cause thousands of hospital visits, asthma attacks, and even deaths.

    I will support clean air policies and other protections that scientists and public health experts have recommended to the EPA to safeguard our air quality."

    Through the Clean Air Promise campaign, the League of Women Voters hopes to inform and engage Americans on the issue of clean air and to demonstrate what is at stake. Some public officials are trying to undermine the Clean Air Act and to strip the Environmental Protection Agency of its ability to limit air pollution and emission of toxics like mercury, arsenic and other dangerous substances which threaten public health. The League will ask its members to make the promise to protect clean air and will actively work to engage the public and our leaders to make the promise as well. Other clean air advocacy groups are expected to join the campaign in the coming days and weeks.

    "We have to promise each other to protect our air. So the League of Women Voters is asking our communities to stand up and demand that our elected officials promise to keep us safe from the pollution that we cannot control ourselves," said MacNamara.

    "This is a social commitment that we make to each other and which we depend on our elected officials and Congress to carry out and safeguard. Clean air saves lives, and we need to ensure clean air for our children and families in the future. We look forward to working with others to renew the clean air promise," MacNamara said.

    "Air pollution causes thousands of asthma attacks and emergency room visits – but that’s not all. Air pollution is also responsible for debilitating lung disease; heart attacks; damage to infants’ and children’s developing brains, robbing them of IQ; cancer, and deaths," said Dr. Peter Wilk, executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility. "That is too high a price for the American people to pay.

    "We can and we must clean America’s air. We can’t let politics stand in the way. Speaking on behalf of doctors and health professionals across the country, Physicians for Social Responsibility deeply supports the Promise Campaign," Dr. Wilk added.

    "As the mother of an asthmatic child, I have seen firsthand the effects of poor air quality and air pollution," said Alexandra Allred, a mother of an asthmatic child and an advocate for clean air. "My son has been battling this painful and debilitating disease for years, and it’s time that our political and government leaders took the common-sense steps to control the air pollution that hurts him. We need stronger public health protections so other families and children aren’t forced to suffer. I say 'thank you’ to the League of Women Voters for dedicating their organization’s time, talent and resources to fighting dirty air," she said.

    For decades, the League of Women Voters has put the health of families ahead of other concerns. The League was one of the first environmental organizations to speak out for the Clean Air Act and the EPA. Today’s announcement included the release of a new television ad supporting the Clean Air Promise campaign. The ad, featuring a voice over by Alexandra Allred, asks viewers to make their own promise to support clean air and ask others to do the same. The ad features several asthmatic children conducting everyday tasks and being treated for asthma. To watch the ad, click here. To learn more about the Clean Air Promise, visit http://peoplenotpolluters.org/

    "HOME MOVIES" :30

    VISUAL / SOUND

    VOICEOVER

    CITATION

    Home movie footage…

    Kids with nebulizers and inhalers,some with parents, some alone, some outside, some inside.

    ALEX ALLRED: We’re not asking for your pity, or your sympathy.

    We’re not asking for your time,

    or your wallet.

    We’re just asking…

    for your promise.

    Alex Allred, aged 46, is an author, kickboxing instructor, the author of more than 20 non-fiction books, and a passionate advocate on clean air issues. She is a former U.S. bobsledder, winning the gold medal at US Nationals in 1994, and was named the Athlete of the Year by the US Olympic Committee in 1994. She served as the Executive President of Downwinders, an anti-pollution organization in Midlothian, from 2010 to 2011.

    Pictures o f:

     

    Alex, age 11

    Ella, age 8

    Kamira, age 3

    Sophia, age 11

    Chris, age 9

    ALLRED:

    Every year in this country, harmful emissions cause thousands of illnesses, asthma-related hospital visits and even deaths.

    We’re asking every citizen, every elected official, and every parent in America to promise to protect our children from dangerous pollution.

    Now.

    Go to peoplenotpolluters.org

    Don’t just support cleaner air for our kids.

    Promise it.

    Approximately 20,000 people a year die prematurely from air pollution. A 2009 National Academy of Sciences study reported that nearly "20,000 people die prematurely from such causes [air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels]." [The New York Times, October 19, 2009]

    Mercury pollution from refineries, chemical plants, and other industrial facilities causes as many as 2,600 premature deaths a year. In 2011, the EPA proposed an updated standard for mercury emitted by industrial facilities. This updated standard will prevent as many as 2,600 premature deaths, 4,100 heart attacks, and 42,000 asthma attacks a year.

    Mercury pollution from power plants causes as many as 17,000 premature deaths a year. In 2011, the EPA proposed an updated standard for mercury and arsenic from power plants. This update will prevent as many as 17,000 premature deaths and 11,000 heart attacks a year as well as 120,000 asthma attacks.

    Smog and fine particle pollution will cause as many as 34,000 deaths in 2014 alone. Power plant emissions contribute to harmful levels of smog and soot. Delaying EPA’s updated standard will result in many as 34,000 deaths, 15,000 non-fatal heart attacks, and 400,000 asthma attacks in 2014 alone.

    Ozone pollution will cause as many as 12,000 deaths in 2020. Ozone is the primary component of smog. Lowering the amount of ozone in the air to the level recommended by scientists would save as many as 12,000 lives and prevent as many as 58,000 asthma attacks and 5,300 heart attacks in 2020.

    Picture of Noli, age 8

    Text: Make the promise

    Peoplenotpolluters.org

    Brought to you by the League of Women Voters

       

    JULY 25, 2011

    Contact: Kelly Ceballos

    kceballos@lwv.org
    (202) 263-1331

    Peter Wilk, MD
    pwilk@psr.org
    (202) 587-5240

    About the League of Women Voters
    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Learn more: www.lwv.org.###

    "Like" the League on Facebook.

    Follow the League on Twitter @LWV

     

  • Washington, DC --The League of Women Voters Education Fund announced today that Zaida Arguedas, Deputy Executive Director and Senior Director of Global Democracy Programs will travel to Egypt later this week to address women’s rights in advance of the upcoming elections.

    During the five-day trip, Ms. Arguedas will meet with leaders of civil society groups working to address women's rights on a range of issues throughout Egypt. The meetings, which are aimed at ensuring women have a leading role in the forthcoming elections, will take place in Cairo and Alexandria. In addition to these meetings, Ms. Arguedas will sit down for television interviews with Al Tahrir and Maspero networks as well as other media outlets.

    This effort is being coordinated by the U.S. Embassy in Egypt.

    Those interested in learning more about the program should contact Zaida Arguedas.


    Contact: Kelly Ceballos

    kceballos@lwv.org
    (202) 263-1331

    ###

    Become a fan of the League on Facebook.

    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy.


  • North Carolina League speaks out for Voters’ Rights

    The North Carolina League has seen a whirlwind of activity in the last week, speaking out across the state on behalf of voters.  On July 7, League leaders testified or submitted comments at multiple public redistricting hearing held by the joint House and Senate Redistricting Committee. Leaders focused their comments and media outreach on the grave concerns they have regarding what appear to be blatantly racially gerrymandered districts designed to dilute minorities’ voting strength under the state’s proposed legislative and congressional maps.  Days later, League leaders were out in full force in Raleigh to urge the legislature to “Respect the Vote”; speaking at a high-profile public rally where they called upon legislators to reform the state’s deeply flawed redistricting process and also fight back against renewed efforts to override the recent veto of a photo ID bill and do away with pro-voter reforms such as same-day registration and early voting. 

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact:   Jo Nicholas
    July 7, 2011   lwvncpresident1@gmail.com
    http://www.rtpnet.org/lwvnc   910-673-3604

     

    LEAGUE EXPRESSES DEEP CONCERNS WITH REDISTRICTING PLANS

    Raleigh, NC—As the Joint House and Senate Redistricting Committee held a series of hearings across the state today to gain public input on proposed redistricting plans, the League of Women Voters of North Carolina was out in force to offer analysis and provide recommendations for improving the statewide redistricting process.  League representatives testified at or attended at several of the public hearings held across the state, and LWVNC president Jo Nicholas released the following statement:

    “For North Carolina to comply fully with federal and state law, including the Voting Rights Act, the redistricting process must be transparent, open, and responsive to constituents. While we applaud the Committee for the efforts it has taken to ensure transparency and invite public input, we are deeply concerned that the proposed plans repeat the mistakes that have shortchanged all of us—the voters—for decades.

    “The proposed Congressional and state legislative maps are drawn with one outcome in mind: to maximize partisan gains while diluting the power of minority of voters.  These maps attempt to ‘pack’ minority voters into districts in order to stifle their influence.

    “As a significant number of individuals, and civil rights, civic, and community organizations, testified today, these maps benefits lawmakers’ partisan interests while shortchanging minority voters, diluting communities of interest, and paving the way for near-certain Voting Rights Act challenges in court.

    “Every redistricting brings renewed tactics designed to manipulate redistricting for partisan gain, and this year is no different,” Nicholas concluded.  “Before green-lighting any redistricting plan, lawmakers must incorporate a broader spectrum of voices and ideas for drawing districts that best represent the interest of all North Carolinians.” 

    LWVNC has testified at multiple hearings held by the Redistricting Committee and is available for further comment upon request. More information can be found at www.rtpnet.org/lwvnc.
    ###
    The League of Women Voters of North Carolina, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages the informed and active participation in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

     

  • Washington, DC – The League of Women voters today announced a new television ad in Massachusetts that is part of their ongoing “People not Polluters” (www.peoplenotpolluters.org) campaign to educate voters about the public health consequences of anti-Clean Air Act votes in Congress. 

    “Our elected officials are taking bad votes that would block new clean air standards.   Our officials must not endanger public health by failing to limit pollution,” said Elisabeth MacNamara, national president of the League of Women Voters. “The ad campaign’s goal is to raise public awareness of how Senators voted to endanger the health of women, seniors, families and children by blocking new clean air standards that would limit pollution.”

    The new ad highlights an April 6 vote to block clean air standards taken by Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown. To see the Massachusetts ad click here. The ad is part of a major television campaign announced by the League last month. The ads depict a child suffering from respiratory illness and ask viewers to consider the vote and “imagine what it could’ve done – to her.” 

    On April 4, days before the Senate voted on four amendments that would have limited the EPA’s ability to protect public health and clean up air pollution, the American Medical Association warned doctors that increased levels of carbon dioxide, ozone, and other greenhouse gas pollutants make chronic conditions like heart disease and asthma worse.

    There is overwhelming bipartisan support for stricter EPA pollution standards.  A bipartisan survey released on February 16 by the American Lung Association examined public views of EPA’s updating and enforcing clean air standards.  The bipartisan survey, which was conducted by Democratic polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, and Republican firm Ayres, McHenry & Associates, finds that 68 percent of voters oppose congressional action that impedes the EPA from updating clean air standards generally and 64 percent oppose congressional efforts to stop the EPA from updating standards on carbon dioxide. 

    About the League of Women Voters:  The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. The League has been a strong and active supporter of the Clean Air Act since its enactment in 1970.  

     

    The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Membership in the League is open to men and women of all ages.

    Share on Facebook Share this on Facebook.

    Contact: Kelly Ceballos

    kceballos@lwv.org
    (202) 263-1331

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