• Organization:

    At the 1996 convention, bylaws changes were made to simplify the process of forming new Leagues by eliminating the provisional League category, and set the procedure for proposing adoption or amendment of an LWVUS position by concurrence on the floor of convention. The LWVUS Future Planning process was also launched at that convention.

    At the 1998 convention, the bylaws were amended to provide for communication vehicles other than "snail" mail!

  • Organization:

    A hallmark of the new century was the commitment on the part of the League to increased use of electronic communication to League leaders across the nation. A monthly electronic newsletter was begun and the League's membership database became available electronically for direct updating by League membership chairs.

  • To broaden membership and address the issue of membership decline, the 1982 convention amended the bylaws to permit member recruitment by the national and state levels, as well as the local level. Convention delegates also called for the development of a long-range plan for the organization. The plan, which defined the League's mission and outlined goals and strategies for the future, was the subject of spirited debate at the convention. During the 1984-88 period the League s long-range plan was refined and updated, then adopted by the 1988 convention with some modifications.

  • In 1970 the national bylaws requirement for adopting a not-recommended item was changed from three-fifths to a simple majority. "CAs" and "CRs" were dropped from the bylaws, and the national program appeared as one list of issues discussed, amended and adopted at national conventions every two years.

    In 1972, Inter-League Organizations (ILOs), created in many parts of the country to deal with regional issues, were added to the formal structure of the League. The 1974 convention also amended the bylaws to allow men to join the League as full voting members.

  • Delegates to the 1954 convention voted to group League program into Current Agenda ("CAs") government issues chosen for sustained attention and concerted action, and Continuing Responsibilities ("CRs") positions on governmental issues to which the League had given sustained attention and on which it could continue to act. In 1951, "The National Voter" magazine was first published and in 1957 the League of Women Voters Education was established.

  • The depression of the 1930s and the onset of World War II brought far-reaching change to the League. Membership fell from 100,000 in 1924 to 44,000 in 1934. The National League's budget was cut in half, necessitating a major reduction in staff and services to Leagues. Perhaps the most important change was that because of gas rationing, League members started meeting in small groups in their neighborhoods to discuss fundamental issues. These issues included the threat to democracy itself and the importance of the informed individual to the success of democracy.

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    Published by League of Women Voters Education Fund. League's new report, "Thinking Outside the Ballot Box: Innovations at the Polling Place" points to election modernization. Published in 2006., Pub. No. 2079
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    This report details recommended operational and management practices for election officials as they work to implement the new federal provision that mandates states establish a statewide computerized voter registration list by January 2006. Published in 2005., Pub. No. 2072. Published by the League of Women Voters Education Fund.
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    Published by League of Women Voters Education Fund. Safeguarding the Vote outlines a set of recommended operational and management practices for state and local election officials to enhance voting system security, protect eligible voters and ensure that valid votes are counted. Published in 2004., Pub. No. 2065
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    Published by League of Women Voters Education Fund. Helping America Vote provides recommendations that ensure provisional ballots serve their purpose. The report highlights model state practices on specific points and provides useful guidance to state decision makers, Leagues and other advocates working to protect the fundamental right to vote. Published in 2003., Pub. No. 2061

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