• Since the League had inherited its structure from the National American Women Suffrage Association, in 1920 it was a federation of affiliated state Leagues, most of which had been in existence as state headquarters of the NAWSA. State Leagues were the keystone of the League's structure, and had the responsibility for organizing local Leagues. By 1924, the National League was organized in 346 of 433 congressional districts. Twenty-three state Leagues and 15 city Leagues maintained regular business headquarters, nearly all with one or more paid staff.

  • From the spirit of the suffrage movement and the shock of the First World War came a great idea - that a nonpartisan civic organization could provide the education and experience the public needed to assure the success of democracy. The League of Women Voters was founded on that idea.

  • Founding and Early History:

    From the spirit of the suffrage movement and the shock of the First World War came a great idea - that a nonpartisan civic organization could provide the education and experience the public needed to assure the success of democracy. The League of Women Voters was founded on that idea.

  • The 1966 convention redefined program as "those governmental issues chosen for concerted study and action." This change made it possible to have program without the "CA" and "CR" categories, and at the convention in 1968 the program was adopted without categorizing issues. Membership reached a high point in 1969, with almost 157,000 members.

    Issues:

  • 2010 Annual Report
    2010 Annual Report
    The 2010 Annual Report of the League of Women Voters of the United States and its Education Fund provides a financial report on the fiscal year of July 1, 2009 -June 30, 2010.
  • By Jean Pierce

    History of Federal Efforts Related to Equity in Public Schooling

    In the 1896 case, Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court determined that the equal protection clause of the United States Constitution permitted racially separate schools as long as they had equal facilities. Separate but “equal” schools were sanctioned for close to 70 years.

  • Includes the official statements of position for each program area, briefly traces significant past actions and achievements, and indicates links among positions. The LWVUS public policy positions reflect the 2014-2016 program adopted by the 2014 convention of the League of Women Voters of the United States; the "positions in brief" listed there summarize the official statements of position included in this guide. Updated following biennial convention.

    LWVUS, 83 pp., PDF Version. 2013, Pub. No. 386

  • League of Women Voters Annual Report 2008-2009
    League of Women Voters Annual Report 2008-2009

    The 2008-2009 Annual Report of the League of Women Voters of the United States and its Education Fund provides a financial report on the fiscal year of July 1, 2008 -June 30, 2009.

  • 2007-2008 Annual Report
    2007-2008 Annual Report

    The 2007-2008 Annual Report of the League of Women Voters of the United States and its Education Fund provides a financial report on the fiscal year of July 1, 2007 -June 30, 2008. For the historical presidential election year, the narrative report on our activities extends through Election Day, November 4, 2008.

  • Elections present voters with important choices. Whether it is a local race that will affect your community or a national race that could change the direction of the country, it is a time to consider the issues which you care about and decide which candidate you support. Even if you are under 18 and not yet eligible to vote, election campaigns offer an excellent way to learn about the people and issues that affect your future.

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