• Observing Your Government in Action

    This is an easy-to-read "how to" resource guide on organizing and conducting observer corps programs. Building on its decades of experience in empowering citizens to monitor local governmental meetings through these programs, the League has compiled best practices about starting and maintaining an observer program.

    Publication No. 2080

  • "5 Things You Need to Know on Election Day" is a public awareness campaign letting voters know the simple steps they can take to protect their vote. The 5 Things cards familiarize voters with new election procedures and empower voters to take action to personally ensure their vote is counted.

    You can download them for free below!

    Unfortunately, we are sold out of the English Version. To Purchase in Spanish, visit the League Store.
    Pub. No. 2078. 100 per pack.

  • Looking For Sunshine Cover

    The League of Women Voters Education Fund has created this Resource Guide to assist Leagues in dealing with this era of increasingly difficult public access to government information. This guide provides an overview of the most significant federal and state laws—those that protect and those that restrict public access to government information. It also suggests various ways that Leagues can become more active in this area, and identifies other national and state organizations involved in these issues.

     

  • Local Voices Report Cover

    In 2005, with generous funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the LWVEF launched "Local Voices: Citizen Conversations on Civil Liberties and Secure Communities." This project had three main components: public deliberations in ten communities across the country, focus groups and quantitative public opinion research to explore attitudes and values toward homeland security and civil liberties. The findings the Local Voices project are chronicled in this report.

  • Adapted from a pamphlet published by the League of Women Voters Education Fund in 1980

    Every four years, the Electoral College, a little known feature of our Constitution, enjoys a fleeting movement of fame. About six weeks after the long grind of the presidential election is over, the 538 members of the college meet in their respective states to perform their sole constitutional function: to elect the President and Vice-President of the United States.

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