Elisabeth MacNamara

In 2016, our goals are very simple. We plan to: grow the vote, protect the vote and empower voters with information, through our nonpartisan voters’ guides and candidate forums and debates, and through our online tools—espeicallyVOTE411.org. These three priorities stand on their own, but are they are also inextricably intertwined.

In a letter to President Obama, three of the nation's leading voting rights organizations—Demos, Project Vote, and the League of Women Voters—urged the Administration to come into compliance with the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) by providing voter registration to eligible persons through the federally-facilitated health benefit exchanges set up under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In the letter, the groups—who have previously won many NVRA-enforcement lawsuits—indicated that they are prepared to seek legal recourse if necessary. The letter follows over two years of advocacy efforts on the part of the organizations regarding ongoing violations of the NVRA. Widely known as the “motor voter” law, the NVRA requires that registration services be offered in tandem with transactions conducted by certain government programs. Its requirements apply to all the health benefit exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The League sent a letter to President Obama urging him to veto the FY 2016 Appropriations bill should it arrive on his desk with damaging campaign finance riders.

The LWVUS recently submitted an amicus curiae brief with other groups to the Supreme Court in Evenwel v. Abbott.  The case will determine whether states are required to use a metric other than total population, such as registered voters or citizen voting age population (CVAP), in redistricting.

The League of Women Voters joined with other concerned organizations to urge the Internal Revenue Service to adopt new regulations that properly interpret the statutory eligibility requirements to qualify for tax-exempt status as a 501(c)(4) “social welfare” organization.

The League joined national civil rights, voting rights, labor and criminal justice organizations in submitting comments to the Census Bureau asking that incarcerated persons be counted at their home address, rather than the prison facility they occupy on census day. The League believes that if the Census Bureau modified its residence rule with respect to incarcerated persons, all states and localities will have the opportunity to more accurately and equitably reflect the incarcerated population in their redistricting plans.

The League sent a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on House Administration urging Representatives to vote no on H.R. 412 and H.R. 195. These bills would repeal the presidential public financing system and terminate the Election Assistance Commission (EAC).

The League joined a letter calling on the U.S. Senate to hold up or down floor votes during the September work period to ensure the Election Assistance Commission is fully staffed. The EAC is vital to ensuring that the right to vote for all eligible Americans is not compromised and that elections run efficiently and fairly.


September 8, 2014

The League submitted a statement to the Presidential Commission on Election Administration outlining the five key suggestions the League proposes for improving the polling place experience for voters.