Candidate debates have a long history in American Politics. At every level of government – from city government to state legislature, from Congress to President of the United States – candidates participate in debates to help voters understand who they are and what they stand for.

Watching debates is one of the best ways that we can educate ourselves before we head to the voting booth. Luckily, when it comes to figuring out how to get the most out of debate-watching (and having fun while doing it!), LWV has your back.

Electing the President
With the battle for the White House already underway and presidential primaries looming soon, the League has answers to voters' most frequently asked questions. We have once again teamed up with the Newspaper in Education Institute to produce Electing the President, a handy guide outlining all you need to know about the presidential election process. The guide will appear in newspapers nationwide as well as be shared with schools, community organizations and voters who need a helping hand as they navigate the election process.

Voting is the most powerful way to have your voice heard, and it is the core of our democracy. The League works all year, every year, to empower all eligible voters to participate in our political system.

The LWVEF is pleased to release a new whitepaper entitled Power the Vote 2012: How a new initiative launched results for millions of voters.

The League of Women Voters has a long history with candidate debates.  Between 1960 and 1984, the League sponsored every presidential and vice presidential candidate debate.  The League may no longer sponsor these televised debates, but state and local Leagues across the country continue to sponsor candidate debates at the state and local levels, just as they always have.

Elections present voters with important choices. Whether it is a local race that will affect your community or a national race that could change the direction of the country, it is a time to consider the issues which you care about and decide which candidate you support. Even if you are under 18 and not yet eligible to vote, election campaigns offer an excellent way to learn about the people and issues that affect your future.