The League joined 168 national, state and local organizations in urging the President to nominate a highly qualified and widely respected professional to serve as the next Director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

The League joined an amicus in the case of McCrory v. Harris. The case will be argued at the U.S. Supreme Court on December 5, 2016.

Bethune-Hill v. Virginia State Board of Elections is scheduled to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court during the current term and covers the topic of racial gerrymandering in Virginia.

The League sent comments to the Census Bureau regarding the decision to continue using the “usual residence” rule. The rule counts incarcerated citizens at their prison addresses rather than their home addresses.

Wittman v. Personhuballah is scheduled to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court on March 21, 2016 and covers the topic of racial gerrymandering in Virginia.

The LWVUS recently submitted an amicus curiae brief with other groups to the Supreme Court in Evenwel v. Abbott.  The case will determine whether states are required to use a metric other than total population, such as registered voters or citizen voting age population (CVAP), in redistricting.

The League joined national civil rights, voting rights, labor and criminal justice organizations in submitting comments to the Census Bureau asking that incarcerated persons be counted at their home address, rather than the prison facility they occupy on census day. The League believes that if the Census Bureau modified its residence rule with respect to incarcerated persons, all states and localities will have the opportunity to more accurately and equitably reflect the incarcerated population in their redistricting plans.

The League joined an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission.

The League joined other organizations on a letter to the U.S. Census Bureau regarding tabulation procedures for incarcerated people. 


 

Rooted in the movement that secured the right to vote for women, the League has worked to foster civic engagement and enhance access to the vote since our organization was founded in 1920.

Pages