The League submitted written comments to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB). The comment are in regard to the EPA SAB's study on the effects that hydraulic fracturing has on drinking water sources.

The LWVUS recently submitted an amicus curiae brief with other groups to the Supreme Court in Evenwel v. Abbott.  The case will determine whether states are required to use a metric other than total population, such as registered voters or citizen voting age population (CVAP), in redistricting.

The League of Women Voters joined with other concerned organizations to urge the Internal Revenue Service to adopt new regulations that properly interpret the statutory eligibility requirements to qualify for tax-exempt status as a 501(c)(4) “social welfare” organization.

With the battle for the White House already underway and presidential primaries looming soon, the League has answers to voters' most frequently asked questions. We have once again teamed up with the Newspaper in Education Institute to produce Electing the President, a handy guide outlining all you need to know about the presidential election process. The guide will appear in newspapers nationwide as well as be shared with schools, community organizations and voters who need a helping hand as they navigate the election process.

The League joined other coalition partners in sending a letter to the Office of Management and Budget requesting continued funding for Great Lakes restoration priorities.

The League joined a letter to members of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee urging them to oppose S. 1324, a bill from Senator Capito that would gut the Clean Air Act and block the EPA's Clean Power Plan.

The League joined a letter to U.S. Senators encouraging Senators to support and co-sponsor the Stop Super PAC-Candidate Coordination Act. The bill, sponsored by Senator Leahy (D-VT), would shut down individual-candidate Super PACs which are used to circumvent candidate contribution limits.

The League joined national civil rights, voting rights, labor and criminal justice organizations in submitting comments to the Census Bureau asking that incarcerated persons be counted at their home address, rather than the prison facility they occupy on census day. The League believes that if the Census Bureau modified its residence rule with respect to incarcerated persons, all states and localities will have the opportunity to more accurately and equitably reflect the incarcerated population in their redistricting plans.

The League joined coalition partners on a letter to Congress urging the renewal of critical provisions of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and refundable Child Tax Credit (CTC) before they expire. The EITC and CTC are among the nation’s strongest tools to help working families escape poverty and achieve greater self-sufficiency.